US Politics

The United States (US) is a constitutional federal republic made of 50 states. The US covers an area of 3.8 million square miles and has a population of 324 million inhabitants. The capital of the US is Washington D.C. and the largest city is New York City with a population of 8.5 million.

The United States is a federal government in which the president, congress and federal courts share power according to the constitution.

The executive branch is headed by the President and is independent of legislature and the judiciary.

Legislative power is held by two chambers of Congress, the Senate and the House of Representatives.

The United States Senate is the upper house of the United States Congress. The Senate is composed of senators, there are two senators per state, each serving terms of six years. There are currently 50 states and therefore 100 senators. The Senate is able to ratify treaties, confirm cabinet secretaries, Supreme Court justices, federal judges, other executive officials and ambassadors. The Vice President is the presiding officer of the Senate.

The House of Representatives is the lower house of the United States Congress. The House is composed of representatives who sit in congressional districts which are allocated to each state on the basis of population. There are 435 representatives and this is fixed by law. The Speaker of the House is the presiding officer of the House of Representatives.

Two political parties, the Democratic Party and the Republican Party dominate American politics.

The Democratic Party was founded in 1828. The political position is centre-left. The majority of the party has ideology in modern liberalism and social liberalism.

The Republican Party was founded in 1854. The political position is centre-right to right-wing. The majority of the part has ideology in conservatism, economic liberalism, fiscal conservatism, social conservatism and federalism.

US Presidents

  • 1789-1797 – No Party – George Washington
  • 1797-1801 – Federalist – John Adams
  • 1801-1809 – Democrat-Republican – Thomas Jefferson
  • 1809-1817 – Democrat-Republican – James Madison
  • 1817-1825 – Democrat-Republican – James Monroe
  • 1825-1829 – Democrat-Republican – John Quincy Adams
  • 1829-1837 – Andrew Jackson
  • 1837-1841 – Martin Van Buren
  • 1841-1841 – Whig – William Henry Harrison
  • 1841-1845 – Whig – John Tyler
  • 1845-1849 – James K Polk
  • 1849-1850 – Whig – Zachary Taylor
  • 1850-1853 – Whig – Millard Fillmore
  • 1853-1857 – Franklin Pierce
  • 1857-1861 – James Buchanan
  • 1861-1865 – Abraham Lincoln
  • 1865-1869 – Andrew Johnson
  • 1869-1877 – Ulysses S Grant
  • 1877-1881 – Rutherford B Hayes
  • 1881-1881 – James A Garfield
  • 1881-1885 – Chester A Arthur
  • 1885-1889 – Grover Cleveland
  • 1889-1893 – Benjamin Harrison
  • 1893-1897 – Grover Cleveland
  • 1897-1901 – William McKinley
  • 1901-1909 – Theodore Roosevelt
  • 1909-1913 – William Howard Taft
  • 1913-1921 – Woodrow Wilson
  • 1921-1923 – Warren G Harding
  • 1923-1929 – Calvin Coolidge
  • 1929-1933 – Herbert Hoover
  • 1933-1945 – Franklin D Roosevelt
  • 1945-1953 – Harry S Truman
  • 1953-1961 – Dwight D Eisenhower
  • 1961-1963 – John F Kennedy
  • 1963-1969 – Lyndon B Johnson
  • 1969-1974 – Richard Nixon
  • 1974-1977 – Gerald Ford
  • 1977-1981 – Jimmy Carter
  • 1981-1989 – Ronald Reagan
  • 1989-1993 – George H W Bush
  • 1993-2001 – Bill Clinton
  • 2001-2009 – George W Bush
  • 2009-2017 – Barack Obama
  • 2017-Current – Donald Trump

Suggested Reading

Trump Timeline 

Trump Political History

Trump 2016 Republican Campaign

Trump 2016 Presidential Campaign

US Justice Department Sues Trump

Donald Trump Bankruptcies

John McCain is not a War Hero

Trumps Mexican Wall

Trump and Golf

Trump and Russia

1984=2017

Rise of the Planet of the Donalds

Simpsons Predicts Trump Presidency

The Liefather is the New Godfather

The Trumping

Trump and the Nine Circles of Hell

60 Unforgettable Trump Quotes

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